Rick CrawfordRick Crawford – AR

Current Position: US Representative for AR 1st District since 2011
Affiliation: Republican
Former Position(s): Radio announcer, businessman, and U.S. Army soldier. from 1985 – 2011

Other positions: 
Ranking Member of the Counterterrorism, Counterintelligence, and Counterproliferation Subcommittee

Featured Quote: 
House Democrats are now defending/considering “art” as “infrastructure” because they want the U.S. to emulate Soviet-style infrastructure? Absolute nonsense… American tax payers won’t go along with this, either.

Featured Video: 
Congressman Rick Crawford questions Robert Mueller during hearing

Representative Crawford discusses Afghanistan with Region 8 News
KAIT8, Bradley BrewerAugust 28, 2021 (Medium)

JONESBORO, Ark. (KAIT) – Rep. Rick Crawford (R-Jonesboro) was in Jonesboro Saturday to speak with Region 8 News about the evacuation crisis in Afghanistan.

Crawford panned President Biden’s exit strategy and said he seriously doubts evacuation efforts will be finished by the end of the month.

But, he also wanted to let those in Region 8 know that he and others in Congress, are working hard to make sure that no Americans are left behind in Afghanistan.

“Right now, there are American people in Afghanistan that feel like they’ve been abandoned,” Crawford said. “What I’m telling you is we’re going to do everything that we can to not abandon the Americans left behind in Afghanistan. In fact, that’s our ethos as someone who’s a veteran, you don’t leave your fellow soldiers behind, you just don’t do that.”

Summary

Current Position: US Representative for AR 1st District since 2011
Affiliation: Republican
Former Position(s): Radio announcer, businessman, and U.S. Army soldier. from 1985 – 2011

Other positions: 
Ranking Member of the Counterterrorism, Counterintelligence, and Counterproliferation Subcommittee

Featured Quote: 
House Democrats are now defending/considering “art” as “infrastructure” because they want the U.S. to emulate Soviet-style infrastructure? Absolute nonsense… American tax payers won’t go along with this, either.

Featured Video: 
Congressman Rick Crawford questions Robert Mueller during hearing

News

Representative Crawford discusses Afghanistan with Region 8 News
KAIT8, Bradley BrewerAugust 28, 2021 (Medium)

JONESBORO, Ark. (KAIT) – Rep. Rick Crawford (R-Jonesboro) was in Jonesboro Saturday to speak with Region 8 News about the evacuation crisis in Afghanistan.

Crawford panned President Biden’s exit strategy and said he seriously doubts evacuation efforts will be finished by the end of the month.

But, he also wanted to let those in Region 8 know that he and others in Congress, are working hard to make sure that no Americans are left behind in Afghanistan.

“Right now, there are American people in Afghanistan that feel like they’ve been abandoned,” Crawford said. “What I’m telling you is we’re going to do everything that we can to not abandon the Americans left behind in Afghanistan. In fact, that’s our ethos as someone who’s a veteran, you don’t leave your fellow soldiers behind, you just don’t do that.”

Twitter

About

Source: Government page

Growing up in an Air Force family, Rick lived all over the United States and in England. Rick’s parents taught him devotion to service from a young age. Those simple life lessons have remained with Rick, and are at the forefront of his mind when working on creating a more prosperous America for generations to come.

Upon graduating from high school, Rick enlisted in the United States Army where he served as an Explosive Ordnance Disposal Technician. He completed four years of service, advancing to the rank of Sergeant, and earned numerous medals for service at home and in Southwest Asia.

After completion of his military service, Rick matriculated to Jonesboro, Arkansas, to attend Arkansas State University and graduated in 1996 with a degree in Agriculture Business and Economics.

Once he completed college, Rick started competing in rodeos across the country and discovered his talent in announcing and producing. He then began his own announcing company, which led to a career in agri-news reporting and broadcasting. Rick also served as marketing manager for one of the largest John Deere dealer groups in North America.

Wanting to create a better and brighter future for Arkansas’s First District, Rick decided to run for Congress in 2010. In his five terms in Congress, Rick has voiced the concerns of his district while bringing solutions to the national table. He is on the Agriculture Committee, serving on the Subcommittees on Commodity Exchanges, Energy, and Credit, and General Farm Commodities and Risk Management. Rick has played a critical role in passing two Farm Bills, having served on the Conference Committees in 2014 and 2018. He views agriculture as a national security issue – a nation that cannot feed itself is a nation that is not secure.

National security is one of Rick’s top priorities and he was appointed in 2017 to serve on the the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence (HPSCI), the first and only Arkansas representative to do so. He is currently the Ranking Member of the Counterterrorism, Counterintelligence, and Counterproliferation Subcommittee.

Rick also serves on the Transportation and Infrastructure Committee where he has worked to create safer and more reliable highways, waterways, railroads, and runways. His most significant accomplishment for the First District was the interstate designation of I-555, a vital corridor for Northeast Arkansas. He currently serves on the Subcommittee on Highways and Transit and as the Ranking Member of the Subcommittee on Railroads, Pipelines, and Hazardous Materials. In this leadership role, Rick influences decisions on the economic and safety regulation of railroads and the safety oversight of pipelines and pipeline facilities.

During his tenure in Congress, Rick has been honored for his legislative efforts by:

• USA Rice Federation Friend of the Rice Industry Award
• AgriBank & AgriBank District Farm Credit Council Friend of Farm Credit Award
• National Federation of Independent Businesses, Guardian of Small Business Award
• Retire Safe, Standing Up for American Seniors Award
• Arkansas State University College of Agriculture and Technology Outstanding Alumnus Award
• Farm Bureau Federation, Friend of Farm Bureau Award
• National Association of Manufacturing, Award for Manufacturing Legislative Excellence
• Rural Community Alliance, Champion of Rural Arkansas Award
• National Association of Mutual Insurance Companies Benjamin Franklin Public Policy Award
• International Foodservice Distributors Association Thomas Jefferson Award
• Associated Builders & Contractors Champion of the Merit Shop Award

Rick and his wife Stacy, also an ASU graduate, live in Jonesboro with their two children, two dogs, four chickens, and two rabbits.

In his spare time he enjoys spending time with his family, cooking chili, watching old western films, and playing guitar and singing for his band, Triple Nickel.

Voting Record

Votes on Bills

Caucuses 

 

 

Offices

Washington, DC Office
Hours of Operation
Monday-Friday 9:00AM-5:00PM (EST)
2422 Rayburn HOB
Washington, DC 20515
Phone: (202) 225-4076
Fax: (202) 225-5602
Jonesboro Office
Hours of Operation
Monday-Friday 8:00AM-5:00PM
2400 Highland Drive, Suite 300
Jonesboro, AR 72401
Phone: (870) 203-0540
Fax: (870) 203-0542
Cabot Office
Hours of Operation
Monday-Friday 8:00AM-5:00PM
112 S. 1st
Cabot, AR 72023
Phone: (501) 843-3043
Fax: (501) 843-4955
Mountain Home Office
Hours of Operation
Monday-Friday 8:00AM-5:00PM
1001 Highway 62 E, Suite 9
Mountain Home, AR 72653
Phone: (870) 424-2075
Fax: (870) 424-3149

 

Contact

Email:

Web

Government Page, Campaign Site, Twitter, YouTube, Wikipedia

Politics

Source: none

Campaign Finance

Open Secrets – We Follow the Money

Voting Record

VoteSmart – Key Votes & Ratings

Search

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Wikipedia Entry

Eric Alan “Rick” Crawford (born January 22, 1966)[1] is an American politician who has been the U.S. Representative for Arkansas’s 1st congressional district since 2011. He is a member of the Republican Party. Before he was elected to Congress, Crawford was a radio announcer, businessman, and U.S. Army soldier.

Early life and education

Crawford was born at Homestead Air Force Base in Florida, the son of Ruth Anne and Donnie J. “Don” Crawford.[2] He grew up in a military family; his father served in the United States Air Force. He graduated from Alvirne High School in Hudson, New Hampshire. Crawford enlisted in the United States Army and served as an explosive ordnance disposal technician assigned to the 56th Ordnance Detachment at Fort Indiantown Gap in Pennsylvania.[3] He left the U.S. Army after four years’ service[4] at the rank of Sergeant. After his service, Crawford attended Arkansas State University in Jonesboro, Arkansas, graduating in 1996 with a B.S. in agriculture business and economics.[5]

Rodeo and music career

In 1993, Crawford was seriously injured in a rodeo accident. He transitioned into a career in radio announcing for the rodeo. He also launched a music career, and has been called a “singing cowboy” as he sometimes performed his music while riding a horse. In 1994, Legacy, Inc. released his album Crackin’ Out, recorded at Haage Studios in Kirbyville, Missouri. Crawford dedicated the project to “that dyin’ breed called ‘Cowboy’”.[6]

Radio career

Crawford was a news anchor and agri-reporter on KAIT-TV in Jonesboro and farm director on KFIN-FM. He owned and operated the AgWatch Network, a farm news network heard on 39 radio stations in Arkansas, Missouri, Tennessee, Mississippi, and Kentucky.[7]

U.S. House of Representatives

Crawford’s freshman portrait (112th Congress)

Elections

2010

Crawford ran for Arkansas’s 1st congressional district after U.S. Representative Marion Berry decided to retire. He was endorsed by Governor Tim Pawlenty of Minnesota, former Arkansas Governor Mike Huckabee, former federal official Asa Hutchinson, and former U.S. Representative Ed Bethune.[8] He won the Republican primary, defeating Princella Smith, 72% to 28%,[9] and the general election, defeating Berry’s chief of staff Chad Causey, 52% to 43%.[10]

2012

Crawford was reelected, defeating Democratic nominee Scott Ellington, 56% to 39%.[11]

2014

Crawford was reelected to a third term, defeating Heber Springs Mayor Jackie McPherson, 63% to 33%.[12]

2016

Crawford was reelected to a fourth term, defeating Libertarian candidate Mark West, 76% to 24%.[13]

2018

Crawford was reelected to a fifth term, defeating Democratic nominee Chinton Desai, 70% to 29%.[13]

2020

Crawford was reelected unopposed.[14]

Tenure

On January 5, 2011, Crawford was sworn into office as a member of the 112th Congress. He is the first Republican to represent his district since Reconstruction. The last Republican to represent the district was Asa Hodges, who vacated the seat on March 3, 1875.[15] Crawford is a member of the Republican Study Committee.[16]

In 2010, Crawford signed a pledge sponsored by Americans for Prosperity to vote against any global warming legislation that would raise taxes.[17]

Crawford supported President Donald Trump‘s 2017 executive order to impose a ban on travel to the U.S. by citizens of seven Muslim-majority countries, saying that the order was “designed to keep our nation safer” but that “Green card holders and aides of the U.S. military should be allowed entry.”[18]

Crawford voted for the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017.[19] He believed the bill would make it easier for people to file their taxes and that “the vast majority of middle-income families in my district will get to keep more of their money to use as they wish.” He also believed that local businesses would hire more and raise employees’ pay in the wake of the bill’s implementation.[20]

In 2019, Crawford received a death threat from James Powell, a 43-year-old Arkansas resident. Powell was charged with “first-degree terroristic threatening” after an investigation by U.S. Capitol Police and the FBI. The charge carries a maximum six-year prison sentence and $10,000 fine.[21][22]

Crawford opposed Obergefell v. Hodges, the Supreme Court ruling that same-sex marriage bans are unconstitutional.[23]

In December 2020, Crawford was one of 126 Republican members of the House of Representatives to sign an amicus brief in support of Texas v. Pennsylvania, a lawsuit filed at the United States Supreme Court contesting the results of the 2020 presidential election, in which Joe Biden defeated[24] Trump. The Supreme Court declined to hear the case on the basis that Texas lacked standing under Article III of the Constitution to challenge the results of an election held by another state.[25][26][27]

As of October 2021, Crawford had voted in line with Joe Biden‘s stated position 7.5% of the time.[28]

Legislation

On January 18, 2013, Crawford introduced the Farmers Undertake Environmental Land Stewardship Act (H.R. 311; 113th Congress).[29] The bill would require the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to modify the Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasure (SPCC) rule, which regulates oil discharges into navigable waters and adjoining shorelines.[30] The rule requires certain farmers to develop an oil spill prevention plan certified by a professional engineer and may require them to make infrastructure changes.[30] According to supporters, the bill would “ease the burden placed on farmers and ranchers” by making it easier for smaller farms to self-certify and raising the level of storage capacity under which farms are exempted.[31]

Committee assignments

Congressman Crawford questions Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack in 2013.

Temporary resignation

On November 8, 2019, Crawford announced he would temporarily resign from his seat on the House Intelligence Committee. Taking his place was Jim Jordan. This move allowed Jordan to lead President Donald Trump‘s public impeachment hearings. Crawford said he would resume his position once the “impeachment hoax” had concluded.[32]

Electoral history

Arkansas 1st Congressional District Republican primary election, 2010
PartyCandidateVotes%
RepublicanRick Crawford14,46171.79
RepublicanPrincella Smith5,68228.21
Arkansas 1st Congressional District Election, 2010
PartyCandidateVotes%
RepublicanRick Crawford93,22451.79
DemocraticChad Causey78,26743.48
GreenKen Adler8,3204.62
Write-insWrite-ins2050.11
Arkansas 1st Congressional District election, 2012
PartyCandidateVotes%
RepublicanRick Crawford (inc.)138,80056.23
DemocraticScott Ellington96,60139.13
LibertarianJessica Paxton6,4272.60
GreenJacob Holloway5,0152.03
Arkansas 1st Congressional District election, 2014
PartyCandidateVotes%
RepublicanRick Crawford (inc.)124,13963.25
DemocraticJackie McPherson63,55532.38
LibertarianBrian Scott Willhite8,5624.36
Arkansas 1st Congressional District election, 2016
PartyCandidateVotes%
RepublicanRick Crawford (inc.)183,86676.3
LibertarianMark West57,18123.7
Arkansas 1st Congressional District election, 2018
PartyCandidateVotes%
RepublicanRick Crawford (inc.)138,75768.9
DemocraticChintan Desai57,90728.8
LibertarianElvis Presley4,5812.3
Arkansas 1st Congressional District election, 2020
PartyCandidateVotes%
RepublicanRick Crawford (inc.)237,596100

Personal life

Rick and Stacy Crawford

Crawford and his wife, Stacy, live in Jonesboro with their children. He attends Central Baptist Church, a Southern Baptist congregation in Jonesboro.[33]

References

  1. ^ “Biography | Representative Rick Crawford”. crawford.house.gov.
  2. ^ “freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com”.
  3. ^ “Improvised bombs ‘tricky’ to handle, Arkansas congressman says”. Congressman Rick Crawford. 25 October 2018. Retrieved 13 December 2019.
  4. ^ Stiles, Andrew (2010-10-27). “National Review: Turning Arkansas Red”. National Public Radio. Retrieved 2010-10-31.
  5. ^ “Rick Crawford (Arkansas)”. Ballotpedia. Retrieved 2021-09-27.
  6. ^ “Music in the Mountains Show welcomes special guest musician Rick Crawford”. Areawide Media. 14 June 2012. Retrieved 28 October 2021.
  7. ^ “About – Rick Crawford for Congress”. www.meetrickcrawford.com.
  8. ^ “meetrickcrawford.com endorsements”.
  9. ^ “Our Campaigns – AR District 01 – R Primary Race – May 18, 2010”. www.ourcampaigns.com.
  10. ^ “Our Campaigns – AR – District 01 Race – Nov 02, 2010”. www.ourcampaigns.com.
  11. ^ “Our Campaigns – AR – District 01 Race – Nov 06, 2012”. www.ourcampaigns.com.
  12. ^ “NOVEMBER 4, 2014 ARKANSAS GENERAL ELECTION AND NONPARTISAN RUNOFF ELECTION OFFICIAL RESULTS OUTSTANDING PROVISIONAL & UOCAVA BALLOTS”. results.enr.clarityelections.com. Retrieved 13 December 2019.
  13. ^ a b “Rick Crawford (Arkansas)”. Ballotpedia.
  14. ^ Barger, Kaitlin (3 November 2020). “Arkansas Republican Rick Crawford re-elected to Congress”. KATV. Retrieved 20 November 2020.
  15. ^ “Biographical Directory of the U.S. Congress – Retro Member details”. bioguideretro.congress.gov.
  16. ^ mcallennow.com voter resources, Rick Crawford
  17. ^ “/americansforprosperity.org Americans for Prosperity Applauds U.S. House Candidate Rick Crawford” (PDF).
  18. ^ Blake, Aaron (January 31, 2017). “Whip Count: Here’s where Republicans stand on Trump’s controversial travel ban”. Washington Post.
  19. ^ Almukhtar, Sarah (19 December 2017). “How Each House Member Voted on the Tax Bill”. The New York Times. Retrieved 21 December 2017.
  20. ^ “Senate OKs tax bill; House revote set”. Northwest Arkansas Democrat Gazette. Retrieved 21 December 2017.
  21. ^ Connolly, Griffin. “Arkansas man arrested for death threats against Sen. Tom Cotton, Rep. Rick Crawford”. Roll Call. Retrieved 19 April 2020.
  22. ^ “Man jailed in Faulkner Co. accused of threatening Rep. Rick Crawford and Sen. Tom Cotton”. Fox 16. Retrieved 19 April 2020.
  23. ^ “Arkansas politicians, activists divided on same sex marriage ruling – Talk Business & Politics”. Talk Business & Politics. 28 June 2015. Retrieved 21 December 2017.
  24. ^ Blood, Michael R.; Riccardi, Nicholas (December 5, 2020). “Biden officially secures enough electors to become president”. AP News. Archived from the original on December 8, 2020. Retrieved December 12, 2020.
  25. ^ Liptak, Adam (2020-12-11). “Supreme Court Rejects Texas Suit Seeking to Subvert Election”. The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on December 11, 2020. Retrieved 2020-12-12.
  26. ^ “Order in Pending Case” (PDF). Supreme Court of the United States. 2020-12-11. Archived (PDF) from the original on December 11, 2020. Retrieved December 11, 2020.
  27. ^ Diaz, Daniella. “Brief from 126 Republicans supporting Texas lawsuit in Supreme Court”. CNN. Archived from the original on December 12, 2020. Retrieved December 11, 2020.
  28. ^ Bycoffe, Anna Wiederkehr and Aaron (2021-10-22). “Does Your Member Of Congress Vote With Or Against Biden?”. FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved 28 October 2021.
  29. ^ “H.R. 311 – Summary”. United States Congress. Retrieved 10 March 2014.
  30. ^ a b “H.R. 311 – CBO”. Congressional Budget Office. Retrieved 10 March 2014.
  31. ^ “Committee passes legislation to ease burden of SPCC program”. High Plains Journal. 23 December 2013. Archived from the original on 11 March 2014. Retrieved 11 March 2014.
  32. ^ KATV (2019-11-08). “Rep. Crawford announces temporary resignation from the House Intelligence Committee”. KATV. Retrieved 2019-11-11.
  33. ^ Staff (5 January 2011). “Ten Southern Baptists sworn in as new reps”. Baptist Press. Archived from the original on 26 December 2014. Retrieved 25 December 2014.

External links

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by

Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Arkansas’s 1st congressional district

2011–present
Incumbent
U.S. order of precedence (ceremonial)
Preceded by

United States representatives by seniority
131st
Succeeded by


Issues

Source: Government page

Committees

House Committee on Agriculture

  • Subcommittee General Farm Commodities and Risk Management
  • Subcommittee on Commodity Exchanges, Energy, and Credit

House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure

  • Ranking Member, Subcommittee on Railroads, Pipelines, and Hazardous Materials
  • Subcommittee on Highways and Transit

House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence

  • Ranking Member, Subcommittee on Counterterrorism, Counterintelligence, and Counterproliferation

Legislation

Sponsored and Cosponsored

Issues

X
French HillFrench Hill – AR

Current Position: US Representative for AR 2nd District since 2015
Affiliation: Republican

Featured Quote: 
As a longtime advocate for religious freedom, I appreciate @POTUS
prioritizing our call to action to fill the important role of Ambassador-at-Large for International Religious Freedom.

Featured Video: 
Arkansas Week Special Edition: French Hill

Yellen Urged by Republicans to Block Taliban From IMF Reserves
Bloomberg, Eric MartinAugust 17, 2021 (Medium)

U.S. Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen should intervene at the International Monetary Fund to prevent Taliban-led Afghanistan from being able to use almost $500 million in reserves, Republican House members said.

The group of 18 lawmakers, including Arkansas’s French Hill, wrote to Yellen on Tuesday in a letter obtained by Bloomberg News, asking Yellen to take action at the fund and respond to their request by Thursday afternoon. They also called on Yellen to provide more detail on measures being taken at the IMF to make sure the assets, known as special drawing rights, aren’t used in ways that run counter to U.S. national interest.

IMF members approved the creation of a record $650 billion in global reserves this month to help emerging and low-income nations deal with mounting debt and Covid-19. By fund rules, the assets are divided among IMF members roughly proportionally to the size of their economies, which for Afghanistan is 0.07% of the total, or $455 million.

The SDRs are scheduled to be transferred to central banks around the world on Aug. 23.

Summary

Current Position: US Representative for AR 2nd District since 2015
Affiliation: Republican

Featured Quote: 
As a longtime advocate for religious freedom, I appreciate @POTUS
prioritizing our call to action to fill the important role of Ambassador-at-Large for International Religious Freedom.

Featured Video: 
Arkansas Week Special Edition: French Hill

News

Yellen Urged by Republicans to Block Taliban From IMF Reserves
Bloomberg, Eric MartinAugust 17, 2021 (Medium)

U.S. Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen should intervene at the International Monetary Fund to prevent Taliban-led Afghanistan from being able to use almost $500 million in reserves, Republican House members said.

The group of 18 lawmakers, including Arkansas’s French Hill, wrote to Yellen on Tuesday in a letter obtained by Bloomberg News, asking Yellen to take action at the fund and respond to their request by Thursday afternoon. They also called on Yellen to provide more detail on measures being taken at the IMF to make sure the assets, known as special drawing rights, aren’t used in ways that run counter to U.S. national interest.

IMF members approved the creation of a record $650 billion in global reserves this month to help emerging and low-income nations deal with mounting debt and Covid-19. By fund rules, the assets are divided among IMF members roughly proportionally to the size of their economies, which for Afghanistan is 0.07% of the total, or $455 million.

The SDRs are scheduled to be transferred to central banks around the world on Aug. 23.

Twitter

About

French Hill 1

Source: Government page

A ninth generation Arkansan, French Hill is the 22nd Member of Congress to represent central Arkansas in the U.S. House of Representatives. He was elected on November 4, 2014, and began his first congressional term in the 114th Congress on January 3, 2015. He won reelection to serve in the 115th, 116th, and 117th sessions of Congress.

He is a member of the U.S. House Committee on Financial Services where he serves as Ranking Member of the Subcommittee on Housing, Community Development and Insurance. Rep. Hill serves alongside Senator Pat Toomey (R-Pa.), Congresswoman Donna Shalala (D-Fla.) on the Congressional Oversight Commission established by the CARES Act. In 2019, Rep. Hill was selected to be a member of the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA) Republican House Whip Team.

Prior to his congressional service, Rep. Hill was actively engaged in the Arkansas business community for two decades as a commercial banker and investment manager. He was founder, chairman, and chief executive officer of Delta Trust & Banking Corp., which was headquartered in Little Rock and recently merged with Arkansas-based Simmons First National Corp.

Prior to his community banking work in Arkansas, Rep. Hill served as a senior official in the administration of President George H.W. Bush. From 1989 until 1991, Rep. Hill served as Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Treasury for Corporate Finance, where one of his key assignments was representing the United States as a negotiator in the historic bilateral talks with Japan known as the Structural Impediments Initiative (SII).

After the fall of the Berlin Wall, Rep. Hill led the design of U.S. technical assistance to the emerging economies of eastern and central Europe in the areas of banking and securities. In 1991, at the age of 34, President Bush appointed Mr. Hill to be Executive Secretary to the President’s Economic Policy Council (EPC), where he coordinated all White House economic policy. For his leadership and service at the Treasury and the White House, Rep. Hill was awarded the Distinguished Service Award by U.S. Secretary of the Treasury Nicholas Brady in January 1993. Prior to his Executive Branch Service, from 1982 until 1984, Rep. Hill served on the staff of then-U.S. Senator John Tower (R-TX) as well as on the staff of the U.S. Senate Committee on Banking, Housing, & Urban Affairs.

Throughout his career, Rep. Hill has been active in civic affairs. He is a past president of the Rotary Club of Little Rock and served as the 2013 chairman of the Little Rock Regional Chamber of Commerce.

He has received numerous awards and recognition for his long-time support of the Boy Scouts of America, the arts and humanities, tourism, and historic preservation in Arkansas. He is an avid outdoorsman, boy scout, and spends recreational time outside hiking, fishing, and more.

Rep. Hill is a magna cum laude graduate in Economics from Vanderbilt University. He is married to the former Martha McKenzie of Dallas, Texas, and they have a daughter and a son. The Hill family resides in Little Rock.

Voting Record

Votes on Bills

Caucuses 

Rep. Hill serves on the Congressional Oversight Commission established by the CARES Act alongside Senator Pat Toomey (R-Pa.) and Congresswoman Donna Shalala (D-Fla.).

In 2019, Rep. Hill was selected to be a member of the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA) Republican House Whip Team.

He serves on the Japan-United States Friendship Commission, an independent federal government agency established by Congress in 1975.

Rep. Hill is also a member of the British-American Parliamentary Group, which was founded in 1944 as an independent parliamentary group between Members of the British Parliament and Members of the United States Congress.

Rep. Hill’s Caucus memberships:

Families, Community, and Education

Congressional Caucus on Foster Youth

Congressional Scouting Caucus

Congressional Prayer Caucus

Congressional Solidarity Caucus

Congressional Historic Preservation Caucus

Congressional Humanities Caucus

Opportunity Gap and Skilled Workforce

Congressional Skilled American Workforce Caucus (Co-Chair)

Congressional Bipartisan Congressional Arts Caucus

Congressional Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) Caucus (Vice Co-Chair)

Congressional STEAM Caucus

U.S. Military and Foreign Relations

Congressional National Guard and Reserve Components Caucus (NGRCC)

Congressional Army Caucus

Congressional Air Force Caucus

Congressional Missile Defense Caucus

Congressional House Republican Israel Caucus

Congressional Israel Allies Caucus

Congressional U.S.-Japan Caucus

Congressional Study Group on Japan

Congressional Battlefield Caucus

Congressional Caucus on India and Indian-Americans

Congressional French Caucus

Small Business and Economic Growth

Congressional Natural Gas Caucus

Congressional House Small Brewers Caucus

Congressional Chicken Caucus

Congressional Wine Caucus

Health and Wellness

Congressional Diabetes Caucus

Congressional Kidney Caucus

Congressional Dyslexia Caucus

Congressional Congenital Heart Caucus

Congressional Caucus on Fitness

Conservation

Congressional International Conservation Caucus

Congressional Boating Caucus

Congressional Sportsman’s Caucus

Offices

DISTRICT OFFICES

Contact

Email:

Web

Government Page, Campaign Site, Twitter, YouTube, Facebook, Wikipedia

Politics

Source: none

Campaign Finance

Open Secrets – We Follow the Money

Voting Record

VoteSmart – Key Votes & Ratings

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Wikipedia Entry

James French Hill (born December 5, 1956) is an American businessman and politician serving as the U.S. Representative for Arkansas’s 2nd congressional district since 2015. He is a member of the Republican Party.

Early life, education and career

President George H. W. Bush with French and Martha Hill.

Hill was born in Little Rock, Arkansas.[1] He graduated with a Bachelor of Arts degree in economics from Vanderbilt University.[2] He attended the UCLA Anderson Graduate School of Management, where he earned a certified corporate director designation.[3]

From 1982 to 1984, Hill was an aide to Republican Senator John Tower.[1] He was a staffer on the Senate Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs Committee.[1] Hill was executive secretary to President George H. W. Bush’s Economic Policy Council from 1991 to 1993, and Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Treasury for Corporate Finance from 1989 to 1991.[1][4] Hill founded and was CEO and chairman of the Board Delta Trust and Banking Corporation in Little Rock until its acquisition by Simmons Bank in 2014.[5]

U.S. House of Representatives

Elections

Official portrait for the 114th Congress

2014

Hill ran for the 2nd district U.S. House seat after fellow Republican Tim Griffin decided instead to run for lieutenant governor. Hill defeated Democratic nominee Pat Hays, the mayor of North Little Rock,[6] 52 to 44 percent.[7]

2016

Hill was renominated in the Republican primary over Brock Olree of Searcy (White County) and was reelected with 58% of the vote against the Democratic nominee, former Little Rock School District Board President Dianne Curry, and Libertarian nominee Chris Hayes of North Little Rock.[citation needed]

2018

In 2017, Arkansas’s 2nd district was included on the initial list of Republican-held seats targeted by the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee in 2018.[8] In the November general election, Hill defeated Democratic nominee Clarke Tucker with 52.1% of the vote to Tucker’s 45.8%. Libertarian Joe Swafford received 2%.[9]

2020

Hill ran for another term. Sarah Huckabee Sanders endorsed Hill, speaking at a rally in support of him.[10]

In 2020, the Hill campaign warned that Democratic nominee Joyce Elliott was “as dangerous as they come”.[1] Hill warned that if elected, Elliott would “be a member of the Democratic conference and she’d be a member of the Congressional Black Caucus and her first vote would be for Speaker Pelosi to be the speaker of the House.”[1] In the November general election, Hill defeated Elliott.[11]

Tenure

Hill has been a member of the U.S. House during the presidencies of Barack Obama, Donald Trump, and Joe Biden. During Trump’s presidency, Hill voted in line with the president’s position 96.8% of the time.[12] At the start of Biden’s presidency, Hill opposed Biden’s decision to cancel the Keystone Pipeline. He said he wanted to work with the Biden administration on policy issues including Iran, free trade, and immigration.[13] As of October 2021, Hill had voted in line with Biden’s stated position 12.5% of the time.[14]

On May 4, 2017, Hill voted to repeal the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (Obamacare) and pass the American Health Care Act.[15][16] He voted for the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017.[17]

On April 17, 2020, House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy appointed Hill to the COVID-19 Congressional Oversight Commission to oversee the implementation of the CARES Act.[18]

Hill praised the Trump administration’s handling of the COVID-19 pandemic.[1]

Hill acknowledged Biden’s victory in the 2020 U.S. presidential election, voting to certify the results of the Electoral College and declining to participate in attempts to overturn the election results.[19][20]

In March 2021, Hill voted against the American Rescue Plan Act of 2021.[21]

In 2020 and 2021, Hill strongly opposed plans by the United States and other nations in the G7 to issue a $650 billion Special Drawing Rights general allocation, calling for a specific and targeted allocation instead.[22]

Hill strongly supported Biden’s airstrikes on Iranian targets in Syria.[23]

On May 19, 2021, Hill was one of 35 Republicans who joined all Democrats in voting to approve legislation to establish the January 6, 2021 commission meant to investigate the storming of the U.S. Capitol.[24]

Committee assignments

Caucus memberships

Electoral history

Arkansas’s 2nd congressional district Republican primary election, 2014
PartyCandidateVotes%
RepublicanFrench Hill29,91655.08
RepublicanAnn Clemmer12,40022.83
RepublicanConrad Reynolds11,99422.08
Arkansas’s 2nd congressional district election, 2014
PartyCandidateVotes%
RepublicanFrench Hill123,07351.86
DemocraticPatrick Henry Hays103,47743.60
LibertarianDebbie Standiford10,5904.46
Write-insWrite-ins1900.08
Arkansas’s 2nd congressional district Republican primary election, 2016
PartyCandidateVotes%
RepublicanFrench Hill (inc.)86,47484.54
RepublicanBrock Olree15,81115.46
Arkansas’s 2nd congressional district election, 2016[29]
PartyCandidateVotes%
RepublicanFrench Hill (inc.)176,47258.34
DemocraticDianne Curry111,34736.81
LibertarianChris Hayes14,3424.74
Write-insWrite-ins3030.1
Arkansas’s 2nd congressional district election, 2018
PartyCandidateVotes%
RepublicanFrench Hill (inc.)132,12552.1
DemocraticClarke Tucker116,13545.8
LibertarianJoe Swafford5,1932.0

Personal life

A ninth-generation Arkansan and a Roman Catholic,[30] Hill resides in Little Rock.[1] He and his wife, Martha McKenzie, have two children.[1]

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i “Hill, Elliott in tight race for U.S. House seat”. Arkansas Online. October 18, 2020. Retrieved November 2, 2020.
  2. ^ Burnett, Lisa (May 20, 2014). “Hill gets GOP nod for District 2”. Arkansas Online.,
  3. ^ “J. French Hill – 40 Under 40 – 1996”. ArkansasBusiness.com. Retrieved November 5, 2014.
  4. ^ “2013 SMEI Arkansas Top Manager of the Year Award”. SMEI.org. Sales and Marketing Executives International, Inc. Archived from the original on November 5, 2014. Retrieved January 11, 2015.
  5. ^ Friedman, Mark; Turner, Lance (March 24, 2014). “Simmons First to Buy Delta Trust for $66M”. ArkansasBusiness.com. Retrieved September 4, 2015.
  6. ^ “GOP’s French Hill wins US House seat in Arkansas”. Associated Press. November 4, 2014. Retrieved November 5, 2014.
  7. ^ “Arkansas House results – 2014 Election Center – Elections and Politics from CNN.com”. CNN. Retrieved November 5, 2014.
  8. ^ Cheney, Kyle (January 30, 2017). “Amid Democratic doldrums, DCCC identifies 2018 targets”. Politico. Retrieved March 23, 2017.
  9. ^ “Arkansas Election Results: Second House District”. New York Times. Retrieved November 30, 2018.
  10. ^ “Sarah Huckabee Sanders encourages Arkansas voters at French Hill rally”. THV 11. October 31, 2020. Retrieved November 20, 2020.
  11. ^ Cushman, Paige (November 3, 2020). “French Hill wins re-election against Democratic opponent Joyce Elliott”. KATV. Retrieved November 20, 2020.
  12. ^ Bycoffe, Aaron (January 30, 2017). “Tracking J. French Hill In The Age Of Trump”. FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved February 18, 2017.
  13. ^ Brock, Roby (February 14, 2021). “U.S. Rep. French Hill notes areas for ‘common ground’ with Biden administration”. Talk Business & Politics. Retrieved February 26, 2021.
  14. ^ Bycoffe, Anna Wiederkehr and Aaron (April 22, 2021). “Does Your Member Of Congress Vote With Or Against Biden?”. FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved October 28, 2021.
  15. ^ “How the House voted to pass the GOP health-care bill”. Washington Post. Retrieved May 4, 2017.
  16. ^ “How every member voted on health care bill”. CNN. Retrieved May 4, 2017.
  17. ^ Almukhtar, Sarah (December 19, 2017). “How Each House Member Voted on the Tax Bill”. The New York Times. Retrieved December 21, 2017.
  18. ^ “Hill named to panel overseeing virus aid”. Arkansas Online. April 18, 2020. Retrieved April 20, 2020.
  19. ^ Lockwood, Frank; Herzog, Rachel (December 15, 2020). “3 state delegates in D.C. accept vote of electors”. Arkansas Online. Retrieved February 26, 2021.
  20. ^ “How Arkansas’s congressmen voted on the objections to the electoral college vote”. KARK. January 7, 2021. Retrieved February 26, 2021.
  21. ^ “FINAL VOTE RESULTS FOR ROLL CALL 49”. clerk.house.gov. Retrieved April 27, 2021.
  22. ^ https://www.wsj.com/articles/congressional-democrats-plan-to-bail-out-china-11612307799?[bare URL]
  23. ^ “Biden’s Syria airstrike earns applause from prominent Republicans”. Fox News. February 26, 2021.
  24. ^ LeBlanc, Paul (May 19, 2021). “Here are the 35 House Republicans who voted for the January 6 commission”. CNN. Retrieved May 19, 2021.
  25. ^ “Membership”. Congressional Arts Caucus. Archived from the original on June 12, 2018. Retrieved May 22, 2018.
  26. ^ “Member List”. Republican Study Committee. Retrieved December 21, 2017.
  27. ^ “Our Members”. U.S. House of Representatives International Conservation Caucus. Archived from the original on August 1, 2018. Retrieved August 2, 2018.
  28. ^ “Members”. U.S. – Japan Caucus. Retrieved December 11, 2018.
  29. ^ “Arkansas Election Results”. The New York Times. November 6, 2018. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 21, 2019.
  30. ^ “Arkansas–2: J. French Hill (R)”. Nationaljournal.com. Retrieved January 11, 2015.

External links

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by

Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Arkansas’s 2nd congressional district

2015–present
Incumbent
U.S. order of precedence (ceremonial)
Preceded by

United States representatives by seniority
221st
Succeeded by


Issues

Committees

Rep. Hill serves on the Republican leadership team for the House Committee on Financial Services and sits on two of its subcommittees:

Rep. Hill is the Ranking Member of the Housing, Community Development, and Insurance Subcommittee.

 

Legislation

Sponsored and Cosponsored

Issues

 

X
Steve WomackSteve Womack – AR

Current Position: US Representative for AR 3rd District since 2011
Affiliation: Republican
Former Position(s): Mayor of Rogers from 2008 – 2011

Featured Quote: 
Our national parks are iconic treasures. The #VIPAct grants active-duty personnel, veterans, and Gold Star families lifetime access to these lands and monuments. I proudly cosponsored and helped pass this small token of appreciation for our heroes.

Featured Video: 
Steve Womack speaks at Impeachment hearing

Rep. Steve Womack tours mask facility in Rogers
KNWA, Justin TrobaughSeptember 1, 2021 (Short)

ROGERS, Ark. (KNWA/KFTA) — Congressman Steve Womack tours a facility in Rogers on Wednesday, September 1, that produces face masks for people across the country.

Efofex produces nearly 750,000 disposable face masks each day.

Congressman Womack says the facility is a way to bring face mask production back to the US and Northwest Arkansas in particular.

“The demand here is not just the pandemic, but it’s a local company here that is using these masks across the spectrum, across the United States with their associates,” Womack said. “That’s what’s creating the demand for the throughput here.”

The majority of masks produced by Efofex are used by Walmart associates.

Summary

Current Position: US Representative for AR 3rd District since 2011
Affiliation: Republican
Former Position(s): Mayor of Rogers from 2008 – 2011

Featured Quote: 
Our national parks are iconic treasures. The #VIPAct grants active-duty personnel, veterans, and Gold Star families lifetime access to these lands and monuments. I proudly cosponsored and helped pass this small token of appreciation for our heroes.

Featured Video: 
Steve Womack speaks at Impeachment hearing

News

Rep. Steve Womack tours mask facility in Rogers
KNWA, Justin TrobaughSeptember 1, 2021 (Short)

ROGERS, Ark. (KNWA/KFTA) — Congressman Steve Womack tours a facility in Rogers on Wednesday, September 1, that produces face masks for people across the country.

Efofex produces nearly 750,000 disposable face masks each day.

Congressman Womack says the facility is a way to bring face mask production back to the US and Northwest Arkansas in particular.

“The demand here is not just the pandemic, but it’s a local company here that is using these masks across the spectrum, across the United States with their associates,” Womack said. “That’s what’s creating the demand for the throughput here.”

The majority of masks produced by Efofex are used by Walmart associates.

Twitter

About

Steve Womack 1

Source: Government page

Home > Biography > Biography
BIOGRAPHY

Congressman Steve Womack has proudly represented the Third District of Arkansas since his election in 2010. He is currently a senior member of the powerful House Appropriations Committee, where he is the Ranking Member of the Financial Services and General Government (FSGG) Subcommittee and also sits on the Defense and Transportation, Housing and Urban Development (THUD) Subcommittees. He formerly served as the Chairman of the House Budget Committee and has been on the Republican Whip Team since his arrival in Congress.

Womack is committed to ensuring that the voices of his constituents are represented and is widely known in the House for his perfect voting record. During his tenure, he has never missed a vote and holds the longest consecutive voting streak maintained by any current member of the U.S. House of Representatives. In his first four terms, while serving in the majority, Womack was the leadership’s go-to member in presiding over the House floor. There’s no better validation of his experience than when then-Speaker Paul Ryan asked him to preside over the 2016 Republican National Convention during the contentious rules vote. Womack was also tapped by Speaker Ryan to lead the 2018 16-member, bipartisan, bicameral Joint Select Committee on Budget and Appropriations Process Reform.

Womack has a strong record of public service to the Natural State, which has been defined by a lifelong philosophy to “lead by example and lead from the front.” As the former Mayor of Rogers, he is credited with leading an unprecedented expansion of the Rogers economy with more than $1 billion in local investment.

Womack retired from the Arkansas Army National Guard in 2009 at the rank of Colonel with more than thirty years of service. His deployment to Sinai, Egypt in 2002 marked the first time a National Guard unit performed the mission of the Multinational Force and Observers. Womack’s Task Force received accolades from the highest levels of military and civilian leaders.

Womack is a graduate of Arkansas Tech University where he was inducted into the ATU Hall of Distinction in 2014. He is a member of the Arkansas National Guard’s OCS Hall of Fame. His military awards include the Legion of Merit, the Arkansas Distinguished Service Medal, and, in 2015, Womack was presented with the Harry S. Truman Award, the highest award given by the National Guard Bureau.

He also serves as the Chairman of the West Point Board of Visitors (BOV), where he supports the U.S. Military Academy – the nation’s preeminent leadership development institution – in its mission to train the next generation of Army officers. He was first appointed to the BOV in 2012 and subsequently elected BOV Chairman in 2017. Womack is currently the only congressional representative from Arkansas to serve on the board.

He and his wife, Terri, have been married for 36 years. They have three sons and three grandsons.

They make their home in Rogers.

Voting Record

Votes on Bills

Caucuses 

  • United States Congressional International Conservation Caucus
  • Republican Study Committee
  • Republican Governance Group

Offices

Washington, D.C. Office

thumbnail

2412 Rayburn House Office Building
Washington, DC 20515

Phone: (202) 225-4301
Fax: (202) 225-5713

Hours of Operation: 8:00 AM – 5:00 PM Central

Rogers Office

thumbnail

3333 Pinnacle Hills, Suite 120
Rogers, Arkansas 72758

Phone: (479) 464-0446
Fax: (479) 464-0063

Hours of Operation: 8:00 AM – 5:00 PM Central

Harrison Office

400 North Main Street, Suite 3
Harrison, Arkansas 72601

Phone: (870) 741-6900
Fax: (479) 464-0063

Hours of Operation: 8:00 AM – 5:00 PM Central

Fort Smith Office

6101 Phoenix Avenue, Suite 4
Fort Smith, Arkansas 72903

Phone: (479) 424-1146
Fax: (479) 464-0063

Hours of Operation: 8:00 AM – 5:00 PM Central

Contact

Email:

Web

Government Page, Campaign Site, YouTube, Twitter, Wikipedia

Politics

Source: none

Campaign Finance

Open Secrets – We Follow the Money

Voting Record

VoteSmart – Key Votes & Ratings

Search

Google

Wikipedia Entry

Stephen Allen Womack[1] (/ˈwˌmæk/ WOH-mack; born February 18, 1957) is an American politician serving as the U.S. Representative for Arkansas’s 3rd congressional district since 2011. The district, which was once represented by future Senator J. William Fulbright, covers much of northwestern Arkansas, including Fort Smith, Fayetteville, Springdale, and Womack’s hometown of Rogers. A member of the Republican Party, Womack was mayor of Rogers before his election to Congress.

Womack chaired the House Budget Committee from 2018 to 2019, and was its ranking member from 2019 to 2021.

Early life, education, and business career

Steve Womack as an Army National Guard lieutenant colonel in 2002

Womack was born in Russellville, Arkansas, the son of Elisabeth F. (Canerday) and James Kermit Womack.[2] He spent most of his childhood in Moberly, Missouri, but moved back to Russellville at age 16 and graduated from Russellville High School in 1975. He graduated from Arkansas Tech University in 1979. Shortly afterward, he enlisted in the Arkansas Army National Guard. He served for 30 years, retiring in 2009 as a colonel. Womack’s father founded KURM-AM in 1979, and Womack served as station manager from 1979 to 1990. He then served as executive officer of the Army ROTC program at the University of Arkansas from 1990 to 1996, then joined Merrill Lynch as a financial consultant.

Mayor of Rogers

In 1998, Womack was elected mayor of Rogers, holding the post for 12 years.[3] During his mayoralty, Womack sought to crack down on illegal immigration by assigning two Immigration and Naturalization Service agents to the Rogers Police Department.[4] As a result, the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund filed a class-action suit against the city’s police force, accusing it of racial profiling.[5]

Womack was reelected unopposed in 2002 and 2006.[6]

U.S. House of Representatives

Elections

2010

In late 2009, Womack jumped into the race for the 3rd District after incumbent Representative John Boozman announced that he would run for the United States Senate. The 3rd is one of the most Republican districts in the South and the nation (Republicans have held it since 1967), and it was generally believed that whoever won the Republican primary would be the district’s next representative. Womack ranked first in the seven-candidate primary with 31% of the vote.[7] In the June runoff, he defeated State Senator and fellow Rogers resident Cecile Bledsoe, 52%-48%.[8]

In the general election, Womack defeated Democratic nominee David Whitaker, 72%-28%.[9]

2012

Womack was originally set to face veteran Ken Aden in his reelection bid, but Aden withdrew from the race on July 8, after admitting to exaggerating his military record. As it was too late to select a replacement candidate for Aden (under Arkansas law, the Democratic Party could only name a replacement at that date if the original candidate died, moved out of the district or opted to seek another office), Womack faced no major-party opposition in November.[10] He was reelected with 76% of the vote.[11]

Tenure

Womack in 2011.

In 2010, Womack signed a pledge sponsored by Americans for Prosperity promising to vote against any global warming legislation that would raise taxes.[12]

Womack was a member of the House Appropriations Committee when in 2014[13] lawmakers inserted a prohibition into an appropriations bill that would prevent USDA staff from working on finishing regulations related to the meat industry.[14]

In a 2015 episode of his show Last Week Tonight with John Oliver, John Oliver criticized Womack for blocking the enforcement of laws proposed by the Grain Inspection, Packers and Stockyards Administration that were designed to protect chicken farmers from being threatened or punished by the companies they work for if they spoke out regarding their farming experiences.[15]

In December 2017, Womack voted for the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017.[16][17][18]

On May 19, 2021, Womack was one of 35 Republicans to join all 217 Democrats present in voting to approve legislation to establish the January 6 commission meant to investigate the storming of the U.S. Capitol.[19][20][21]

As of October 2021, Womack had voted in line with Joe Biden‘s stated position 15% of the time.[22]

Committee assignments

Caucus memberships

Personal life

Womack attends Cross Church Pinnacle Hills, a Southern Baptist church in Rogers, Arkansas.[25]

Womack’s son, James Phillip Womack, was sentenced to nine years in prison on felony gun and drug charges in April 2019.[26]

Electoral history

YearOfficeDistrictDemocraticRepublicanLibertarianOther
2010U.S. House of RepresentativesArkansas’s 3rd districtDavid Whitaker27.56%Steve Womack72.44%
2012U.S. House of RepresentativesArkansas’s 3rd districtSteve Womack75.9%David Pangrac8.09%Rebekah Kennedy (G)16.01%
2014U.S. House of RepresentativesArkansas’s 3rd districtSteve Womack79.41%Grant Brand20.59%
2016U.S. House of RepresentativesArkansas’s 3rd districtSteve Womack77.31%Steve Isaacson22.69%
2018U.S. House of RepresentativesArkansas’s 3rd districtJoshua Mahony32.65%Steve Womack64.78%Michael Kalagias2.57%
2020U.S. House of RepresentativesArkansas’s 3rd districtCeleste Williams31.81%Steve Womack64.31%Michael Kalagias3.88%

References

  1. ^ “Rep. Steve Womack”. legistorm.com. LegiStorm. 2011. Archived from the original on 26 September 2012. Retrieved 2 December 2019.
  2. ^ “Ancestry® | Genealogy, Family Trees & Family History Records”. freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com. Retrieved July 11, 2018.
  3. ^ “Steve Womack (R)”. Election 2012. Wall Street Journal. Retrieved October 28, 2016.
  4. ^ “Arkansas Congressman Criticizes Constituent For Wearing Mexican Flag Shirt”. Fox News Latino. September 10, 2013. Retrieved October 28, 2016.
  5. ^ A Town’s Two Faces. Newsweek (2001-06-04). Retrieved on 2011-06-24.
  6. ^ Bio at Rogers city site. Rogersarkansas.com. Retrieved on 2011-06-24.
  7. ^ “Our Campaigns – AR District 03 – R Primary Race – May 18, 2010”. www.ourcampaigns.com. Retrieved July 11, 2018.
  8. ^ “Our Campaigns – AR District 03 – R Runoff Race – Jun 08, 2010”. www.ourcampaigns.com. Retrieved July 11, 2018.
  9. ^ “Our Campaigns – AR – District 03 Race – Nov 02, 2010”. www.ourcampaigns.com. Retrieved July 11, 2018.
  10. ^ Brantley, Max (July 9, 2012). “Ken Aden dropping out of 3rd District congressional race”. Arkansas Democrat-Gazette. Retrieved August 15, 2012.
  11. ^ “Our Campaigns – AR – District 03 Race – Nov 06, 2012”. www.ourcampaigns.com. Retrieved July 11, 2018.
  12. ^ http://americansforprosperity.org/noclimatetax//wp-content/uploads/2010/04/womack.pdf
  13. ^ “What is the “GIPSA Rider” and why is the House once again attacking farmers’ rights?”. sustainableagriculture.net. June 17, 2014. Retrieved August 1, 2019.
  14. ^ Arnsdorf , Isaac (June 5, 2019). “Chicken farmers thought Trump was going to help them, but his administration did the opposite”. msn.com. Retrieved August 1, 2019.
  15. ^ Haas, Nathaniel (June 1, 2015). “John Oliver vs. chicken”. Politico. Retrieved March 29, 2016.
  16. ^ Almukhtar, Sarah (December 19, 2017). “How Each House Member Voted on the Tax Bill”. The New York Times. Retrieved December 21, 2017.
  17. ^ Kamper, Deni (December 21, 2017). “What You Should Know About the New Tax Plan”. NWAHOMEPAGE. Retrieved December 21, 2017.
  18. ^ “Senate OKs tax bill; House revote set”. Northwest Arkansas Democratic Gazette. December 20, 2017. Retrieved December 21, 2017.
  19. ^ LeBlanc, Paul (May 19, 2021). “Here are the 35 House Republicans who voted for the January 6 commission”. CNN. Retrieved May 19, 2021.
  20. ^ Roll Call 154 Bill Number: H. R. 3233 117th Congress, 1st Session, United States House of Representatives, May 19, 2021. Retrieved May 20, 2021.
  21. ^ How Republicans voted on a commission to investigate the Jan. 6 Capitol riot, Washington Post, May 19, 2021. Retrieved May 20, 2021.
  22. ^ Bycoffe, Anna Wiederkehr and Aaron (October 22, 2021). “Does Your Member Of Congress Vote With Or Against Biden?”. FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved October 28, 2021.
  23. ^ “Our Members”. U.S. House of Representatives International Conservation Caucus. Retrieved August 5, 2018.
  24. ^ “The Tuesday Group Still Lives”. National Review. June 20, 2013. Retrieved March 1, 2021.
  25. ^ “Ten Southern Baptists sworn in as new reps”. bpnews.net. Baptist Press. 5 January 2011. Archived from the original on 26 December 2014. Retrieved 2 December 2019. Here is information on the new House members who have been confirmed to be members of Southern Baptist churches. Arkansas: Rep. Rick Crawford, First District, Nettleton Baptist Church, Jonesboro; Rep. Tim Griffin, Second District, Immanuel BC, Little Rock.; Rep. Steve Womack, Third District, Cross Church Pinnacle Hills, Rogers.
  26. ^ “Arkansas congressman’s son gets 9-year term in gun, drug case”. Arkansas Democrat-Gazette. Bentonville, Arkansas: WEHCO Media. 18 April 2019. ISSN 1060-4332. Archived from the original on 19 April 2019. Retrieved 2 December 2019. BENTONVILLE — The son of an Arkansas congressman was sentenced to nine years in prison last week after pleading guilty to drugs and firearm-related charges. James Phillip Womack, 31, was charged with possession of a controlled substance, possession of a counterfeit substance with purpose to deliver, two counts of possession of drug paraphernalia and possession of firearms by certain persons. Womack resolved his case through a plea agreement Shane Wilkinson, his attorney, reached with David James, deputy prosecutor. Womack is the son of U.S. Rep. Steve Womack, a Republican.

External links

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by

Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Arkansas’s 3rd congressional district

2011–present
Incumbent
Preceded by

Chair of the House Budget Committee
2018–2019
Succeeded by

New office Chair of the Joint Budget and Appropriations Reform Committee
2018–2019
Position abolished
Preceded by

Ranking Member of the House Budget Committee
2019–2021
Succeeded by

U.S. order of precedence (ceremonial)
Preceded by

United States representatives by seniority
154th
Succeeded by


Issues

Source: Government page

Committees

House Committee on Appropriations:

Legislation

Sponsored and Cosponsored

Issues

  • Abortion

    I believe that life begins at conception. As your congressman, I promise to support policies that protect life and human dignity and oppose any attempts to use taxpayer funds for abortion.

  • Agriculture

    Agriculture is an economic engine for our state. It accounts for hundreds of thousands of jobs and billions of dollars in wages and salaries in Arkansas. As a member of Congress from a state that relies heavily on the agricultural industry, I will w…

  • Budget

    I made a commitment to the people of the Third District of Arkansas to cut spending and to make the necessary reforms to put our budget on a sustainable path. During my time in Congress, I have voted for a balanced budget amendment to the Constituti…

  • Defense

    As a 30-year veteran of the United States Army National Guard, I understand the importance of ensuring our nation is protected from those who want to harm us. I will do my best to ensure our military has what they need to keep us safe and protect ou…

  • Education

    The education of our nation’s children is the foundation for our success. While I agree that we must make sure our teachers have the tools to adequately provide quality education, we need to make sure they are not burdened by disconnected bureaucrati…

  • Energy

    Domestic energy production is essential to the growth of our economy and to the security of our nation. We must take an all-of-the-above approach to our energy policy and allow all American energy sources – oil, gas, coal, nuclear, and renewables – t…

  • Foreign Affairs

    The United States is a global leader, and with growing uncertainty in the world, now is no time to vacate our seat. Historically, the U.S. has played an important role in supporting freedom and democracy throughout the world, allowing us to help othe…

  • Health Care

    Spending on health care has outpaced economic growth for years. In 1960, national health care expenditures made up 4.7 percent of our gross domestic product (GDP). In 2013, that percentage had risen to 17.4, and the Congressional Budget Office (CBO)…

  • Immigration

    Illegal immigration continues to be a serious problem in Arkansas and across our country. Our system is broken, and now is the time for Congress to act. Any solution must secure our border and encourage lawful behavior. Over the past couple of years…

  • Small Business

    It would be difficult to overstate the impact of small businesses in America. They are the backbone of our economy and the heart of Main Street. According to the Small Business Administration (SBA), small businesses employ more than half of the emplo…

  • Social Security

    For too long, Washington has failed to address the problems presented by entitlement programs – the driving force behind our debt. When I was elected, I made a promise to represent the people of the Third District, and I refuse to stand by and contin…

  • Tax Reform

    For the first time in over three decades, Congress voted to fundamentally reform our tax code in December of 2017. The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act allows hardworking Americans keep more of their paycheck, creates jobs and increases wages by making American…

  • Transportation

    Congress must do its work to ensure our nation’s highways, railways, and waterways are properly maintained. America’s transportation system facilitates commerce, and it is essential to the economic prosperity of the country. I will continue to work …

  • Veterans

    There is no better barometer for a country than the brave men and women who have risked their lives to defend its freedom. As a 30-year veteran of the United States Army National Guard, I understand the challenges these men and women face when return…

X
Bruce WestermanBruce Westerman- AR

Current Position: US Representative for AR 4th District since 2015
Affiliation: Republican
Former Position(s): State Delegate from 2011 – 2015

Featured Quote: 
I recently signed a letter by @RepMcCaul to @POTUS asking for his continued support for Israel and action to cut off Iranian support to Palestinian terrorists. As the only true democracy in the Middle East, Israel is vital to the region’s stability and our national security.

Featured Video: 
Rep. Bruce Westerman Chats Forest Management and More

U.S. Rep. Bruce Westerman, R-Hot Springs, says the Aug. 31 deadline to withdraw U.S. troops from Afghanistan is arbitrary and unfeasible.

In an interview with Talk Business & Politics on Tuesday (Aug. 24), Westerman said he was fresh out of an intelligence briefing that confirmed his belief that the Biden administration’s Afghanistan withdrawal was impractical.

“No, I do not agree with the August 31st deadline. I don’t think that deadlines should have ever been put in place. I think it was okay to withdraw from Afghanistan, but to do that in a much better planned method using the intelligence that we had and not setting arbitrary deadlines,” he said. “We’ve seen it play out before our eyes, the tragedies that are happening there. And I don’t think we can get all the Americans out by August 31st. And we certainly can’t get all the Afghans out who helped us for 20 years there in Afghanistan.”

Summary

Current Position: US Representative for AR 4th District since 2015
Affiliation: Republican
Former Position(s): State Delegate from 2011 – 2015

Featured Quote: 
I recently signed a letter by @RepMcCaul to @POTUS asking for his continued support for Israel and action to cut off Iranian support to Palestinian terrorists. As the only true democracy in the Middle East, Israel is vital to the region’s stability and our national security.

Featured Video: 
Rep. Bruce Westerman Chats Forest Management and More

News

U.S. Rep. Bruce Westerman, R-Hot Springs, says the Aug. 31 deadline to withdraw U.S. troops from Afghanistan is arbitrary and unfeasible.

In an interview with Talk Business & Politics on Tuesday (Aug. 24), Westerman said he was fresh out of an intelligence briefing that confirmed his belief that the Biden administration’s Afghanistan withdrawal was impractical.

“No, I do not agree with the August 31st deadline. I don’t think that deadlines should have ever been put in place. I think it was okay to withdraw from Afghanistan, but to do that in a much better planned method using the intelligence that we had and not setting arbitrary deadlines,” he said. “We’ve seen it play out before our eyes, the tragedies that are happening there. And I don’t think we can get all the Americans out by August 31st. And we certainly can’t get all the Afghans out who helped us for 20 years there in Afghanistan.”

Twitter

About

Bruce Westerman 1

Source: Government page

U.S. Rep. Bruce Westerman is a Hot Springs native currently serving his fourth term as representative from the Fourth District of Arkansas, having first been elected in 2014. Westerman serves on the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure and as Ranking Member of the Committee on Natural Resources. Westerman also serves on the Minority Whip Team under the leadership of House Minority Whip Steve Scalise.

Prior to serving in Congress, Westerman was elected to two terms in the Arkansas General Assembly, where he was the state’s first Republican House Majority Leader since Reconstruction following the 2013 GOP takeover of the Arkansas House of Representatives.

An engineer and forester by trade, Westerman worked for 22 years at Mid-South Engineering in Hot Springs. He was named Engineer of the Year by the Arkansas Society of Professional Engineers in 2013.

A 1990 graduate of the University of Arkansas with a Bachelor of Science degree in Biological and Agricultural Engineering, Westerman was a four-year walk-on member of the Razorback football team. He was awarded the Outstanding Young Alumni Award in 2005 and the Distinguished Alumni Award in 2012. Westerman is also a graduate of Yale University, earning a Master of Forestry degree in 2001.

Westerman lives in Hot Springs with his wife, Sharon, and their four children. He enjoys hunting and fishing.

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Offices

Washington

202 Cannon House Office Building
WashingtonDC 20515

Phone: (202) 225-3772
Fax: (202) 225-1314

El Dorado

101 N. Washington Ave.
Suite 406
El DoradoAR 71730

Phone: (870) 864-8946
Fax: (870) 864-8958

Hot Springs

101 Reserve St.
Suite 200
Hot SpringsAR 71901

Phone: (501) 609-9796
Fax: (501) 609-9887

Ozark

211 W. Commercial St.
OzarkAR 72949

Phone: (479) 667-0075
Fax: (501) 609-9887

Pine Bluff

100 E. 8th Ave.
Room 2521
Pine BluffAR 71601

Phone: (870) 536-8178
Fax: (870) 536-8364

 

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Wikipedia Entry

Bruce Eugene Westerman (born November 18, 1967) is an American politician serving as the U.S. Representative for Arkansas’s 4th congressional district. Previously, he served as member and the Majority Leader of the Arkansas House of Representatives.

In 2014, Westerman was elected to the House to succeed Tom Cotton, who defeated U.S. Senator Mark Pryor in the 2014 Senate election.

Background

Westerman was raised in and resides in Hot Springs, Arkansas.[1] He graduated as valedictorian of Fountain Lake High School in Hot Springs. He attended the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville, where he played college football for the Arkansas Razorbacks football team. He graduated with a Bachelor of Science in engineering in 1990 and subsequently received a master’s degree in forestry from Yale University.[2]

Westerman worked as an engineer and forester before being elected to the Arkansas House in 2010. He was formerly employed as an engineer and forester by the Mid-South Engineering Company. He served as president of the Arkansas chapter of the American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineering. He is also a former chair of the Arkansas Academy of Biological and Agricultural Engineers, and served on the Fountain Lake School District school board.[citation needed]

Arkansas House of Representatives

Elections

Westerman ran for the Arkansas House of Representatives in 2010 without opposition to succeed fellow Republican Bill Sample, who was elected to the Arkansas State Senate.[3][4][5]

With the 2012 election, Westerman was transferred to his current District 22, in which he also ran without opposition in both the Republican primary and the general election. The incumbent District 22 lawmaker, Republican Nate Bell of Polk County, was switched to District 20.

Tenure

Westerman served as the House Minority Leader in 2012 and House Majority Leader in 2013.[6]

Committee assignments

  • Revenue And Taxation Committee
    • Subcommittee on Sales, Use, Miscellaneous Taxes and Exemptions (chair)
  • State Agencies And Governmental Affairs Committee
  • Insurance and Commerce Committee[6]

U.S. House of Representatives

Westerman’s first official Congress photo (114th Congress)

2014 election

Westerman won the Republican primary on May 20, defeating Tommy Moll, 54%–46%.[7] In November, he defeated Democratic nominee James Lee Witt, a former associate of U.S. President Bill Clinton, 54%-43%.[8]

Tenure

On June 20, 2017, as the only certified forester in the House, Westerman introduced H.R.2936 – Resilient Federal Forests Act of 2017,[9] providing for the culling of overgrown federally managed woods. After passing the House, it was introduced in the Senate on November 2, 2017, where it stalled because of opposition from Democrats lobbied by anti-logging environmentalists.[10]

Westerman voted for the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017.[11]

In December 2020, Westerman was one of 126 Republican members of the House of Representatives to sign an amicus brief in support of Texas v. Pennsylvania, a lawsuit filed at the United States Supreme Court contesting the results of the 2020 presidential election, in which Joe Biden defeated[12] incumbent Donald Trump. The Supreme Court declined to hear the case on the basis that Texas lacked standing under Article III of the Constitution to challenge the results of an election held by another state.[13][14][15]

During the 2021 Capitol riot, Westerman, left behind in House minority leader Kevin McCarthy‘s office when he was evacuated by security, took a Civil War sword from a shattered display for protection and hid from rioters on a toilet.[16]

As of October 2021, Westerman had voted in line with Joe Biden‘s stated position 10% of the time.[17]

Committee assignments

In the 117th Congress, Westerman serves on the:

In the 114th Congress, Westerman served on the:

Caucus memberships

[19]

Electoral history

Arkansas House of Representatives 30th District Election, 2010
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Bruce Westerman n/a 100.00
Arkansas House of Representatives 22nd District Election, 2012
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Bruce Westerman n/a 100.00
Arkansas 4th Congressional District Republican Primary Election, 2014
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Bruce Westerman 18,719 54.45
RepublicanTommy Moll15,65945.55
Total votes34,378 100.00
Arkansas 4th Congressional District Election, 2014
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Bruce Westerman 110,789 53.75
DemocraticJames Lee Witt87,74242.57
LibertarianKen Hamilton7,5983.69
Write-in20.0
Total votes206,131 100.00
Republican hold
Arkansas 4th Congressional District Election, 2016
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Bruce Westerman (incumbent) 182,885 74.9
LibertarianKerry Hicks61,27425.1
Total votes244,159 100.00
Republican hold
Arkansas 4th Congressional District Republican Primary Election, 2018
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Bruce Westerman (incumbent) 40,201 79.8
RepublicanRandy Caldwell10,15120.2
Total votes50,352 100.00
Arkansas 4th Congressional District Election, 2018
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Bruce Westerman (incumbent) 136,740 66.7
DemocraticHayden Shamel63,98431.2
LibertarianTom Canada3,9521.9
Write-in2160.1
Total votes204,892 100.00
Republican hold
Arkansas 4th Congressional District Election, 2020
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Bruce Westerman (incumbent) 191,617 69.7
DemocraticWilliam Hanson75,75027.5
LibertarianFrank Gilbert7,6682.8
Total votes275,035 100.00
Republican hold

References

  1. ^ “About”. Congressman Bruce Westerman. December 3, 2012.
  2. ^ “Bruce Westerman’s Biography”. votesmart.org. Retrieved January 12, 2014.
  3. ^ Westerman plans to run for Sample’s seat in House. Hot Springs Village Voice. September 30, 2009
  4. ^ Westerman to resign from Fountain Lake school board. Hot Springs Village Voice. March 24, 2010
  5. ^ “State Representative District 030 – Certified, 2010”. sos.arkansas.gov. Retrieved January 10, 2014.
  6. ^ a b “Arkansas House Of Representatives”. Arkanhouse.org. Archived from the original on January 2, 2015. Retrieved January 11, 2015.
  7. ^ “Arkansas Primary Election Results, May 20, 2014”. KATV. Retrieved May 21, 2014.
  8. ^ “RealClearPolitics – Election 2014 – Arkansas 4th District – Westerman vs. Witt”. Realclearpolitics.com. Retrieved January 11, 2015.
  9. ^ Westerman, Bruce (November 2, 2017). “H.R.2936 – 115th Congress (2017-2018): Resilient Federal Forests Act of 2017”. www.congress.gov. Retrieved April 2, 2019.
  10. ^ “Bruce Westerman faults forest-management bill blocks on Democrats”. The Washington Times. Retrieved April 2, 2019.
  11. ^ Almukhtar, Sarah (December 19, 2017). “How Each House Member Voted on the Tax Bill”. The New York Times. Retrieved December 21, 2017.
  12. ^ Blood, Michael R.; Riccardi, Nicholas (December 5, 2020). “Biden officially secures enough electors to become president”. AP News. Archived from the original on December 8, 2020. Retrieved December 12, 2020.
  13. ^ Liptak, Adam (December 11, 2020). “Supreme Court Rejects Texas Suit Seeking to Subvert Election”. The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on December 11, 2020. Retrieved December 12, 2020.
  14. ^ “Order in Pending Case” (PDF). Supreme Court of the United States. December 11, 2020. Archived (PDF) from the original on December 11, 2020. Retrieved December 11, 2020.
  15. ^ Diaz, Daniella. “Brief from 126 Republicans supporting Texas lawsuit in Supreme Court”. CNN. Archived from the original on December 12, 2020. Retrieved December 11, 2020.
  16. ^ Leibovich, Mark (April 25, 2021). “Kevin McCarthy, Four Months After Jan. 6, Still on Defensive Over Trump”. The New York Times. Retrieved May 20, 2021.
  17. ^ Bycoffe, Anna Wiederkehr and Aaron (October 22, 2021). “Does Your Member Of Congress Vote With Or Against Biden?”. Retrieved October 28, 2021.
  18. ^ “Membership”. Republican Study Committee. December 6, 2017. Retrieved March 28, 2021.
  19. ^ “Committees and Caucuses”. Congressman Bruce Westerman. December 13, 2012. Retrieved February 24, 2021.

External links

Arkansas House of Representatives
Preceded by

Member of the Arkansas House of Representatives
from the 30th district

2011–2013
Succeeded by

Preceded by

Member of the Arkansas House of Representatives
from the 22nd district

2013–2015
Succeeded by

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by

Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Arkansas’s 4th congressional district

2015–present
Incumbent
U.S. order of precedence (ceremonial)
Preceded by

United States representatives by seniority
236th
Succeeded by


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